Why Diamond?

Diamond is the hardest material known to man and an inert material, which is stable at high temperatures and pH. It is also a much better thermal conductor than silica. According to published thermal conductivity values, the thermal conductivity of diamond is about 1000x that of silica, which may allow for faster thermal equilibration times for LC. Further, diamond is not easily fouled up due to the fact that very few compounds stick to its surface.

The inertness of diamond may allow it to be used with biologically sensitive samples that are often pH sensitive and can easily foul a column.

In theory, diamond-based materials should be stable over the entire pH range (1 – 14). Diamond Analytics’ testing has empirically proven these materials’ stability over long periods of time from pH 1 to pH 13.

The stability of diamond-based particles at temperatures up to 120 ºC has been tested thoroughly and has shown very little degradation over extended periods of time.

While typical carbon-based materials are based off of polymer beads, usually divinylbenzene (DVB), Diamond Analytics’ stationary phases are built off of diamond and a thin polymer layer. Unlike DVB phases, the materials used by Diamond Analytics do not swell or shrink when exposed to organic solvents, and the diamond-based HPLC phases give efficiencies at or greater than 100,000 N/m, which is on par with other reversed-phase HPLC phases.

Diamond is currently used in many applications both in and outside of the oil and gas industry. Some of these applications are: 
   
    • Diamond cutters for oil and gas drill bits (US Synthetic)
    • Cutting tools for machining metals
    • Diamond bearings for downhole drilling tools
        and other bearing applications (US Synthetic Bearings)
    • Wire drawing dies (US Synthetic Wire Die)
    • Roof bits for mining applications (Brady Mining)

To learn more contact us.

Cited References

                                                                                               
DENSITY

Glowka DA, Stone CM.  Effects of thermal and mechanical loading on PDC bit life.  SPE Drilling Engineering 1986;1:201-14.
3.90 g/cm3Bertagnolli, US Synthetic
COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH

Lammer A.  Mechanical properties of polycrystalline diamonds.  Materials Science and Technology 1988;4:949-55.
6.9-7.6 GPaRoberts, Debeers
TRANSVERSE RUPTURE STRENGTH

Wentorf RH, DeVries RC, Bundy FP.  Sintered superhard materials.  Science 1980;208:872-80. 
1.3-1.6 GPaCooley, US Synthetic
YOUNGS MODULUS

Wentorf RH, DeVries RC, Bundy FP.  Sintered superhard materials.  Science 1980;208:872-80.
890 GPaRoberts, Debeers
FRACTURE TOUGHNESS

Lin TP, Cooper GA, Hood M.  Measurement of the fracture toughness of polycrystalline diamond using the double-torsion test.  Journal of Materials Science 1994;29:4750-6. 
13 MPa√m1/2Jiang Qian, US Synthetic
HARDNESS (KNOOP)

Roberts DC.  SYNDITE – its mechanical and physical properties.  Industrial Diamond Review 1979;39:237-41.
49.8 GPaDebeers
COEFFICIENT OF
THERMAL EXPANSION


Glowka DA, Stone CM.  Effects of thermal and mechanical loading on PDC bit life.  SPE Drilling Engineering 1986;1:201-14.
1.3-3.9, 10-6/°CGlowka, SNL
COEFFICIENT OF FRICTION
(PCD on PCD in H2O)


Sexton TN, Cooley CH.  Polycrystalline diamond thrust bearings for down-hole oil and gas drilling tools.  Wear 2009;267:1041-5.
0.05-0.08Sexton, US Synthetic
THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY

Keshavan MK, Liang B, Russell M.  Tribological properties of polycrystalline diamond and its application.  Finer Points 1990;2:21-7.
543 w/m-KLin, UC Berkeley